Illness

Guardianship Guide

Serving as guardian is a serious job. Your fiduciary duties to the ward and the court last until you are discharged and released by the court, and this may go on even past the death of the ward. Failure to comply with your duties and obligations could lead to your removal. You could then be liable civilly or potentially even criminally for your actions. Thus, do not take this job lightly and make sure you discuss any questions you may have with an attorney. (Last revised 2019)

GuardianshipGuide

Protecting the Incapacitated: Guardianship in Texas from Application to Oath

Understanding guardianships in Texas law is made easier by this pamphlet, which discusses alternatives to guardianship, the guardianship process, and other issues related to instituting a guardianship proceeding. (Last revised 2014)

Protecting the Incapacitated: Guardianship in 
Texas

Committed to Healing: Involuntary Commitment Procedures

This pamphlet is unavailable because it is under review for changes to the law.

Provides an introduction to involuntary commitment proceedings in Texas courts, including possible signals of mental health issues, a discussion of involuntary commitment procedures, and a comparison of involuntary commitment and guardianship. (Last revised 2008)

Committed to Healing: Involuntary Commitment 
Procedures

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