COMMENTS

Tell us what you think via @statebaroftexas, tbj@texasbar.com, or P.O. Box 12487, Austin, TX 78711-2487. Letters addressed to the Texas Bar Journal may be edited for clarity and length and become the property of the magazine, which owns all rights to their use.

RE: “PRESIDENT’S PAGE: WHY I GAVE AWAY MY PARKING SPACE,” September 2019, P. 576
My compliments to Randy’s leadership in giving his parking spot to key bar professionals for coming up with good ideas.

I am reminded of a client in a small town an hour or so outside of Chicago. The town’s landmass was reputed to have been the first mound of dirt that appeared when the glaciers retreated.

Winters were stingingly cold up there (a great reason to live in Texas) and the president’s parking spot right by the front door each month went to the employee who did the best job that month, whether customer satisfaction, new sales, safety idea implemented, whatever. Being close to the front door in the president’s spot meant the shortest run in the coldest days of winter.

They also rang a very loud schoolhouse bell whenever a new client was landed so everyone in the entire plant could smile about their collective success. Helping ensure that your employees are appreciated is a wonderful idea. Bravo, Randy. GARY LAWSON, Dallas

 

ON SOCIAL MEDIA

RE: “TYLA PRESIDENT’S PAGE: ‘OFFICER, I WASN’T GOING THAT FAST!’,” September 2019, P. 638

Such an important message from Victor Flores and the @texyounglawyers. It is imperative that us as lawyers make the necessary time to invest in ourselves. Whether it’s physical activity, leisure reading, family time, meditation, or whatever it is that provides you quality me-time, do it. Disconnect and refresh even if it’s for 30 minutes. CHRIS MAZZOLA, President, San Antonio Young Lawyers Association on Instagram


While this is important advice to all those in the legal field, it applies to everyone. An hour is roughly 4% of your day. I’ll speak from my own experience, but it is critical for me to find a moment for some decompression/alone-time … usually in the form of a run. I get to rock out, break a sweat, and ignore the phone. Often running in the hot San Antonio air is the most refreshing part of my day. DANTE ELI DOMINGUEZ, on Instagram


RE: “TECHNOLOGY AND MENTAL HEALTH,” September 2019, P. 598
The average person looks at his or her phone 150 times per day?! Disconnecting from #tech is vital to your #mentalhealth. @TLAPHelps shares great tips for logging out. @statebaroftexas #wellness
LAURA BAGBY, @2CivilityLB on Twitter


RE: “OUTSIDE YOUR COMFORT ZONE,” September 2019, P. 596
Brian’s article was very moving and also very informative. The entire edition of this month’s State Bar Journal was invaluable. Thank you.
LEE GROSS, on LinkedIn

 

RE: “SOLO/SMALL FIRM: DECODING MILLENNIAL LAWYERS,” September 2019, P. 639
Interesting article about managing millennial lawyers. Not sure how I feel about the blanket characterization of millennials considering the phraseology seems to exclude millennial lawyers who are also first-generation lawyers as well.
ZACHARY CABALLERO, @CabbythePoet on Twitter


Author’s Response:
Thank you for your interest in my article “Decoding Millennial Lawyers.” In the first paragraph, I defined millennial lawyers as those born between the early 1980s and the mid-1990s. First generation lawyers are characterized as millennials if they were born during that time period. There are always exceptions to generalizations, but the descriptions of millennial values and the ways I suggested managing millennial lawyers are corroborated by the New York Times article “Graying Firms Wrestle With Making Room for Younger Lawyers” as well as by numerous others sources that I researched when writing my article. I appreciate your taking the time to comment. MARTHA M. NEWMAN, Dallas/Fort Worth

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