Memorials

Submit a memorial at texasbar.com/memorials or call (512) 427-1830. For information on closing a deceased attorney’s practice, go to www.texasbarcle.com/materials/closingapractice.html.

Mark Wells White Jr.

Mark WhiteWhite, 77, of Houston, died August 5, 2017. He served with the Texas National Guard. White received his law degree from Baylor Law School and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1965. He served as secretary of state of Texas from 1973 to 1977; attorney general of Texas from 1979 to 1983; governor of Texas from 1983 to 1987; and worked for Reynolds, White, Allen & Cook in Houston after his public service. White devoted himself to charities and worthwhile causes. It delighted him that the Mark White Elementary School in Houston carries his name. White is remembered for speaking about the important role the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, and Baylor College of Medicine play in leading the health care industry of Texas; championing the importance of Texas history, including protecting the aging USS Texas battleship; and for being sought after for advice during the last 40 years by Democrats and Republicans running for major office in Texas. He is survived by his wife of 50 years, Linda Gale White; sons, attorney Mark W. White III and R. Andrew White; daughter, attorney Elizabeth White Russell; sister, Betty Gerlach; and nine grandchildren.


Ted Z. Robertson

Ted RobertsonRobertson, 96, of Dallas, died October 13, 2017. He served in the U.S. Coast Guard during World War II. Robertson received his law degree from St. Mary’s University School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1949. He practiced law in San Antonio and Dallas until 1960, then worked in the Dallas County District Attorney’s civil department. In 1965, Robertson was appointed to the newly created Dallas County Probate Court No. 2, then in 1969 to the newly created Dallas County juvenile court. In 1975, Gov. Dolph Briscoe appointed him to the 95th District Court of Dallas County. The following year Robertson was appointed by Briscoe to the Dallas Court of Civil Appeals. Gov. Bill Clements appointed him to the Texas Supreme Court in 1982; he assumed the bench to fill Justice Jack Pope’s unexpired term in December and won election for a term that ended in December 1988. Rather than seek re-election, he unsuccessfully challenged newly appointed Chief Justice Tom Phillips in 1988. After his time at the Supreme Court, Robertson served as counsel to the Law Offices of Frank L. Branson. He was also a guest lecturer at SMU Dedman School of Law. St. Mary’s University School of Law honored Robertson as a distinguished alumnus in 1981. He is credited for helping lead the Texas Supreme Court to a modern system of discretionary review. Robertson is remembered for spending time in his backyard garden and enjoying a cigar with his dog, Rocky; the birds; friends; and family. He was also a wise and inspirational friend, adviser, and mentor who cherished true stories and good people. Robertson is survived by his step-daughter, Terry Pletcher; sister-in-law, Barbara “Bobbie” Brewer; cousin, Fred Stone; nephews, Robert Steinkraus, Robert Sidney Blake, and Charles Robertson; and niece, Leslie Hagin.


Bobby J. Moody

Bobby MoodyMoody, 87, of Lubbock, died August 24, 2017. He served in the U.S. Air Force from 1955 to 1958 and was in the Judge Advocate General’s Corps. Moody received his law degree from Baylor Law School and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1955. He was with Klett, Bean & Evans in Lubbock from 1958 to 1960; Evans, Pharr, Trout & Jones in Lubbock from 1960 to 1965; a managing partner in Evans, Trout, Jones & Moody in Lubbock from 1965 to 1975; a managing partner in Jones, Trout, Flygare, Moody & Brown in Lubbock from 1975 to 1988; a partner in Hankins, Penner & Moody in Lubbock from 1988 to 1989; a partner in Hankins & Moody in Lubbock from 1989 to 1992; a partner in Hankins, Moody & Hays in Lubbock from 1992 to 1995; and a partner in Moody & Hays in Lubbock from 1995 to 2009. Moody is remembered for his 50-year association with the Boy Scouts of America, his work with the Lubbock Lions Club, and his service on the board of the South Plains Trust and Estate Council. He is survived by his wife of 65 years, Charlotte Moody; daughters, Pam Moody and Leigh Moody Potokar; and four grandchildren.


Tommy D. McManus

Tommy McManusMcManus, 88, of Tarpley, died June 27, 2017. He received his law degree from South Texas College of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1958. McManus was in private practice in Channelview from 1958 to 1982. He was a charter member of the Texas Criminal Defense Lawyers Association. McManus was an avid fisherman and had a love for gardening and ranching. He is survived by his wife of 56 years, Alice M. McManus; son, Thomas D. McManus Jr.; daughters, Mickey Lynn Neel, Linda M. McManus, and Lynda A. Cole; five grandchildren; and 10 great-grandchildren.


Woodfin C. Henderson

Woodfin HendersonHenderson, 77, of Dallas, died September 12, 2017. He served in the U.S. Army Reserve from 1967 to 1969. Henderson received his law degree from SMU School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1965. He practiced with Williams Bailey for the first 15 years of his career and focused primarily on insurance defense. Henderson then went out on his own and built an insurance and plaintiff practice. A career highlight for him was that he tried and won a case in the U.S. Supreme Court. Henderson is remembered for his love of fishing, golfing, and traveling. He is survived by his daughters, Elizabeth Jenswold and Kathryn Scott; and brother, Walter Henderson.


William Edward Everheart II

William Edward Everheart IIEverheart, 75, of Dallas, died August 24, 2017. He received his law degree from SMU School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1967. Everheart served as regional deputy solicitor and regional solicitor of the U.S. Department of Labor Office of the Solicitor in Dallas from 1967 to 2008. He was a certified Texas Master Naturalist, did extensive research of his genealogy as a member of the General Society of Mayflower Descendants, and was an accomplished alpine mountaineer, having summited 50 of the 53 fourteeners in Colorado, as well as Grand Teton and Mount Rainier. Everheart is survived by his wife of 51 years, Barbara Hulme Everheart; sons, William Tracy Everheart and Edward Terry Everheart; sisters, Jo Ann Everheart, Sandra Eisen, and Susan Guenther; and four grandchildren.


W.O. Shultz

WO ShultzShultz, 91, of Austin, died August 24, 2017. He served in the U.S. Army Air Corps from 1944 to 1945. Shultz received his law degree from the University of Texas School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1957. He served as assistant attorney general in the Attorney General’s Office from 1958 to 1972 and as associate general counsel at the University of Texas Office of General Counsel from 1972 to 2004. Shultz is remembered for his love of dogs and his generous contributions to several animal organizations in Austin. He is survived by his wife of four years, Kay Haynes.


David Stith Curtis

David CurtisCurtis, 87, of Dallas, died June 27, 2017. He served as an F-86 pilot in the U.S. Air Force from 1952 to 1957. Curtis received his law degree from SMU School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1960. He practiced law with David S. Curtis Associates in Dallas until 2015, specializing in estate planning and probate law. Curtis received an Estate Planning and Probate certification from the Texas Board of Legal Specialization in 1977. He was awarded the National Defense Service Medal, Korean Service Medal, and United Nations Service Medal for his military service. Curtis is remembered as a 47-year member of Preston Hollow Presbyterian Church, where he served as an usher, and for his love of reading and Aggie football. He is survived by his wife of 49 years, Rosemary Bobo Curtis; son, Samuel Curtis; daughter, Somer Curtis; brother, John P. Curtis; and three grandchildren.


Robert “Mark” Galloway

Robert Mark GallowayGalloway, 67, of Prosper, died June 23, 2017. He received his law degree from SMU School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1976. Galloway was an attorney with Harris, Means and Means in Corsicana from 1976 to 1977; an assistant criminal district attorney with the Navarro County District Attorney’s Office in Corsicana in 1978; an assistant city attorney in the Dallas City Attorney’s Office from 1979 to 1981; a senior attorney with Sun Oil Company/Oryx Energy in Dallas from 1981 to 1991; a senior division order analyst with Oryx Energy/Kerr-McGee Oil & Gas in Dallas from 1992 to 2001; a senior regulatory analyst with Kerr-McGee Oil & Gas in Dallas and Houston from 2001 to 2003; a senior landman with Kerr-McGee Oil & Gas/Anadarko Petroleum in Houston from 2003 to 2007; and senior landman/land manager with Exco Resources in Houston and Dallas from 2007 to 2014. He was a speaker for the Dallas Bar Association Energy Law Section on “Seismic Property Rights” in 1991 and served as chairman in 1997. Galloway coached his three sons in baseball, taught Sunday school, and volunteered at the food pantry. He is survived by his wife of 35 years, Diane Galloway; and sons, Steven, Jeffrey, and Drew.


Edward H. Hill

Edward HillHill, 86, of Amarillo, died August 8, 2017. He served in the U.S. Army from 1953 to 1955, in the Reserves from 1956 to 1983, and retired as a colonel in the Judge Advocate General’s Corps. Hill received his law degree from the University of Texas School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1957. He was a staff attorney in the Oil and Gas Section of Phillips 66 in Midland from 1957 to 1963 and partner, shareholder, and head of the Real Estate and Oil & Gas Section of Underwood, Wilson, Berry, Stein & Johnson in Amarillo from 1963 to 1996. Hill was chairman of the State Bar of Texas Oil, Gas, and Mineral Law Section, now called the Oil, Gas and Energy Resources Law Section. He received the Distinguished Real Estate Lawyer Lifetime Achievement Award from the State Bar Real Estate, Probate & Trust Law Section in 2006 and the Chief Justice Charles L. Reynolds Lifetime Achievement Award from the Amarillo Bar Association in 2010. Hill was very involved in his church, Polk Street United Methodist Church; served locally and globally as director of the Texas Methodist Foundation; and was a member of the General Board of Global Ministries of the United Methodist Church. He is survived by his daughters, Ann Jenkins and Amy Butler; five grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.TBJ

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