State Bar of Texas Seal

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
January 22, 2016
Contact: Lowell Brown
Communications Division Director, State Bar of Texas
(512) 909-3731
lbrown@texasbar.com

State Bar of Texas, TYLA announce president-elect candidates

THE WOODLANDS — Texas attorneys will choose between Michael C. Smith of Marshall and G. Thomas Vick Jr. of Weatherford in the race for the next president-elect of the State Bar of Texas. The State Bar Board of Directors today approved their nomination as president-elect candidates during its quarterly meeting in The Woodlands.

Also, the Texas Young Lawyers Association recently nominated Baili B. Rhodes of College Station and Alex L. Yarbrough of Amarillo as the next candidates for TYLA president-elect.

State Bar of Texas and TYLA members will cast ballots April 1 - May 2, and election results will be announced May 2. The winner of each race will serve as president from June 2017 until June 2018.

State Bar of Texas candidates

Michael C. Smith

Michael C. Smith is a partner in the Marshall office of Siebman, Burg, Phillips & Smith, LLP, where he handles federal litigation.

Smith is a past chair of the State Bar’s Litigation Section and the Texas Bar Journal Board of Editors, and served on the State Bar Board of Directors from 2005 to 2008. He has appeared as counsel in over 800 cases in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Texas, and served as chair of the Eastern District’s Local Rules Advisory Committee for nine years, and as president of the Eastern District bar association. He is a Texas Bar Foundation Sustaining Life Fellow, editor of O’Connor’s Federal Rules * Civil Trials, and maintains the nationally recognized blog on Eastern District federal court practice EDTexweblog.com. Smith was awarded the Texas Access to Justice Foundation Cy Pres: Impact on Justice award in 2009 and the TexasBarCLE Standing Ovation award in 2010.

He received a bachelor’s degree from East Texas State University in 1986, a master’s in public affairs from the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas in 1989, and a J.D. from Baylor University School of Law in 1992.

G. Thomas Vick

Tom Vick is a partner in Vick Carney LLP in Weatherford. Board certified in family law, he has published dozens of works on various aspects of the law and lectured widely.

Vick chaired the Texas Bar Foundation Board of Trustees in 2013-2014. He served on the State Bar of Texas Board of Directors from 2005 to 2008 and the Texas Access to Justice Commission from 2006 to 2009. A former mayor of Weatherford, Vick has served as president of both the Texas Academy of Family Law Specialists and the Texas Chapter of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, as a chair of the State Bar of Texas Family Law Section, and as chair of the Supreme Court Task Force to Expand Legal Services Delivery.

Vick was named the 2008 State Bar of Texas Family Law Section Outstanding Family Lawyer, given the Texas Academy of Family Law Specialists Judge Sam Emison Award, and named the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers’ Fellow of the Year in 2009. He received presidential citations for service to the State Bar in 2008 and 2012.

Vick received a bachelor’s degree from Austin College in Sherman in 1977 and his J.D. from South Texas College of Law in 1981.

TYLA candidates

Baili Rhodes

Baili B. Rhodes is an associate at West, Webb, Allbritton & Gentry, P.C., where she practices civil litigation, primarily family and employment law.

Rhodes has been a member of the Texas Young Lawyers Association Board of Directors since 2012, serving as secretary in 2014-2015. She is currently vice president of TYLA. Rhodes has served as co-chair and vice chair of the Law Focused Education and Family Law committees and vice chair of the Community Education and National Trial Competition committees. She also served as executive committee advisor to the Diversity and Public Service committees.  

Rhodes has worked on many TYLA projects, including BSAFEBreathe FreeThe Texas Attorney General Guide, Ten Minute Mentor, Educating Educators, If I Knew Then, and Hiring an Employee with a Record. She has served as editor for the Lawyers who Lunch blog, and as contributing author for TYLA eNEWS. She is a member of the Texas Bar Foundation, Texas Bar College, Texas Aggie Bar Association, Brazos County Bar Association, and Brazos Valley Young Lawyers Association.

She earned her B.A. from Texas A&M University in 2005 and her J.D. from Baylor University School of Law in 2008. Rhodes is married to Casey Rhodes. They have two children.

Alex Yarbrough

Alex Yarbrough is an associate at Sprouse Shrader Smith PPLC, where he practices civil litigation. He devotes a significant portion of his practice to representing cities, counties, law enforcement, and the railroad industry.

Yarbrough has served on the Texas Young Lawyers Association Board of Directors since 2013, serving most recently as treasurer of the executive committee. In 2012, Yarbrough was a participant of LeadershipSBOT. LeadershipSBOT, a joint program of the State Bar of Texas and the Texas Young Lawyers Association, is designed to prepare Texas attorneys who have already shown a dedication to improving their practice and their community to become successful state and local leaders.

Yarbrough also serves on the board of directors for the Amarillo Area Young Lawyers Association, and from 2012 to 2015 served on the board for the Epilepsy Foundation, serving most recently as the secretary for the West Texas affiliate.

Yarbrough received his bachelor’s degree from Angelo State University in 2007 and earned his J.D. from Texas Tech University School of Law in 2011. He is married to Kelsey Yarbrough. They have a 3-year-old daughter and a 7-month-old son.

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The State Bar of Texas, created in 1939, is an administrative agency of the Supreme Court of Texas that provides educational programs for the legal profession and the public, administers the minimum continuing legal education program for attorneys, and manages the attorney discipline system. For more information, visit texasbar.com.

The Texas Young Lawyers Association, organized in 1930, is commonly referred to as the “public service arm” of the State Bar of Texas. TYLA’s primary purposes are to facilitate the administration of justice, foster respect for the law, and advance the role of the legal profession in serving the public. All licensed Texas lawyers 36 years old or younger or in their first five years of practice, regardless of age, are automatically members of TYLA. For more information, visit tyla.org.

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