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Texas Lawyers: Making the Case

The resources below are designed to help you talk with a community group about the role of lawyers and the judicial system in our society. It may take time to open minds, but it is a challenge worth undertaking.

Resources for Speaking to Civic/Community Groups

Lawyers Leading the Way

These profiles highlight some of our outstanding lawyers who have helped change the legal landscape in Texas and throughout the nation. Check back often as more profiles and resources are added!

Carlos C. Cadena
Carlos C. Cadena helped end the exclusion of persons of Mexican descent from juries and the segregation of Mexican-American children in Texas’ public schools. …
Click here for the full story.
Read the Texas Bar Blog story featuring Carlos Cadena.

Mary Joe Durning Carroll
A woman helped bring about open government in Texas. Mary Joe Durning Carroll drafted the legislation that became the Texas Open Meetings Act and the Texas Open Records Act. …
Click here for the full story.
Read the Texas Bar Journal "Rough Road to Justice" article featuring Mary Joe Durning Carroll.

Tom C. Clark
Tom C. Clark is the first and only Texan to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court. President Harry Truman’s appointment of Clark to the Supreme Court in 1949 dismayed liberals and conservatives alike. …
Click here for the full story.

Reynaldo G. Garza
Reynaldo G. Garza, who served as a judge on a federal district court and on the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals, knew as a child that he wanted to be a lawyer. …
Click here for the full story.

Joe Greenhill
One of Joe Greenhill’s biggest cases was one he ultimately lost. In April 1950, Greenhill, then first assistant attorney general for Texas, argued before the U.S. Supreme Court in Sweatt v. Painter, a lawsuit brought by an African-American man denied admission to the University of Texas School of Law. …
Click here for the full story.
Read the Texas Supreme Court Advisory on Joe Greenhill.

Sarah T. Hughes
Sarah T. Hughes is best remembered as the federal judge who swore in Lyndon B. Johnson as president aboard Air Force One following the assassination of President John F. Kennedy on Nov. 22, 1963, in Dallas. …
Click here for the full story.
Read the Texas Bar Journal "Rough Road to Justice" article featuring Sarah Hughes.

Barbara Jordan
Born in 1936 in Houston’s Fifth Ward, Barbara Jordan grew up unconscious of the limitations that segregation placed on her and other African-Americans. …
Click here for the full story.
Read the Texas Bar Journal article on Barbara Jordan.

William Wayne Justice
U.S. District Judge William Wayne Justice knew early in life that he would have a legal career. Justice was seven years old when his father changed the nameplate above the door of his office to “W.D. Justice and Son.” …
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Read the Texas Bar Journal article featuring William Wayne Justice.

Louise B. Raggio
Frustrated because her husband had to sign bail bonds for her clients, Louise B. Raggio decided to do something about it. She helped draft the Texas Marital Property Act of 1967 …
Click here for the full story.
Read the Texas Bar Journal article on Louise Raggio.

Joe Reynolds
Joe Reynolds saw his first action in World War II on Guam in 1944. In February 1945, he landed with the 3rd Marine Division on Iwo Jima, site of some of the fiercest fighting in the war. “I saw them raise the flag at Iwo Jima.” …
Click here for the full story.
View an interview with Joe Reynolds.
Read the Texas Bar Journal "Texas Legal Legends" article featuring Joe Reynolds.

Barefoot Sanders
Prior to President John F. Kennedy’s fateful visit to Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963, Barefoot Sanders, then the U.S. attorney for the Northern District of Texas, warned administration officials that the visit could put the president in danger. …
Click here for the full story.
Read the Texas Bar Journal article on Barefoot Sanders.

Robert S. Strauss
Dubbed by one journalist as the “insider’s insider,” Robert S. Strauss used his people skills to reinvigorate the Democratic Party in the wake of its disastrous 1968 national convention in Chicago … but presidents from both parties turned to him for advice. …
Click here for the full story.

Heman Sweatt
Heman Marion Sweatt failed to achieve his goal of becoming a lawyer. But Sweatt’s courage in pursing a lawsuit after he was refused admission to the University of Texas School of Law paved the way for other African-Americans to receive a legal education in Texas. …
Click here for the full story.
Read the Texas Bar Journal article on Heman Sweatt.

Hortense Sparks Ward
In 1910, Hortense Sparks Ward became the first woman admitted to the Texas state bar. Fifteen years later, Ward was one of three lawyers who became the first women to serve on the Texas Supreme Court …
Click here for the full story.
Read the Texas Bar Journal article on Hortense Sparks Ward.

Sarah Weddington
Before she turned 28, Sarah Weddington twice argued the same case before the U.S. Supreme Court and won a decision in the case, which changed the legal landscape on abortion. …
Click here for the full story.
View an interview with Sarah Weddington.
Read the Texas Bar Journal article on Sarah Weddington. 

Video Resources

Texas Legal Legends
This oral history series preserves and shares the perspectives of legendary Texas lawyers.

State Bar of Texas YouTube Channel
View videos from the annual State Bar YouTube video contest and other videos related to our justice system and the legal profession.

Choose Well: A Series on Justice in Texas -

Civic Engagement Toolkit

Making the Case is all about civic engagement, which just means that you are becoming more aware of and actively involved with your community and helping to foster a greater understanding of the civic responsibilities we all share. These tools will help you reach out to your community and get you on your way to making the case for the liberties Texas lawyers protect!

The Civic Engagement Toolkit covers:

• Ideas for Speaking to Civic/Community Groups
• Possible Speaking Venues
• How Do I Get Started?
Speaking Tips and Techniques [Website]

Feedback

Talked with a community group? Tell us about it! Email us at statebarpresident@texasbar.com.

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